MAD for mobile

I was able to wrap up the Summit “graveyard shift” the same way I began the week: Hanging out with the Red Hat Mobile folks. Love those guys.

This session was centered around MAD: microservices, agile, and DevOps. On top of that, Cian Clarke, John Frizelle, and Philip Hayes of Red Hat Mobile showed how all 3 of these pieces relate to Red Hat Mobile Application Platform.

Cian began talking about the new era of applications. Apps can’t cost hundreds of thousands of dollars anymore. They can’t take 6 months to develop; that’s far too long. They don’t live for decades–traditional software lasts for a long time.

“Now, the idea of an application living for 10 years is almost laughable.”

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Making the world a safer place with systemd, docker, persistence, and patience

Sometimes things don’t go the way you want. But if you’re Dan Walsh, you don’t give up. You keep working because security is important. Containers are also important, so surely there’s a way to bring these two important things together. Surely.

Dan, a senior principal software engineer for Red Hat, tackled the touchy subject of systemd running with docker. Now, ordinarily, talking about docker or systemd would cause a flurry of responses–champions and detractors. Talking about them together? You must be crazy, Dan. Well maybe so, but Dan is also Dan. That means he’s all for doing the right thing–the right way–to keep businesses and Red Hat customers happy.

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Who says tech conferences aren’t magical?

 

I mean, really? If you haven’t heard: The craziest thing went down today at Red Hat Summit. It’s probably a first ever for a tech conference and that’s not even the amazing part. We married some amazing people. To each other. They hitched without a hitch. It was beautiful, romantic, geeky, exciting, punny, and absolutely heart-warming.

 

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Jim delivers the rings while Paul and crew set up.

I wouldn’t trade the experience of seeing these two wonderful people commit to each other for anything. See what I did there? Commit. Get it? Anyway…

 

Paul Cormier, Red Hat EVP and president of Products and Technologies, presided over the wedding while Jim Whitehurst, our fearless leader, acted as ring bearer.

And it gets better!

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Burr Sutter & company blow your mind at Red Hat Summit

The best demos are live demos. They’re intense, fast-paced, and full of excitement–for the audience, of course. The presenters never want excitement. They want everything to work as expected. And the keynote demo this morning delivered all of that and more.

“Think of this as our flying trapeze act.”

Burr Sutter, Red Hat’s director of developer experience, gave a demo that spoke to the core of Red Hat Summit: The developers. The operations teams. Those that do. This demo built on the concepts that Paul Cormier addressed earlier in the morning. Developers feel many pains in their day-to-day lives and need resources to make apps work, then into production. Even getting their environment set up properly can be a chore. File tickets. Wait. Hope. Get resources. Code. Rise and repeat.

On the other side, operations teams are constantly getting barraged with requests from developers. Ticket after ticket comes in requesting resources. But developers don’t understand all that ops have to deal with. Dependencies, requests, patches, updates, more tickets, more requests, more updates. It’s impossible to keep up with.

DevOps to the rescue

The power of DevOps is that these teams can be linked together in culture, processes, and tools. What if you had a way to automate all of this? A single place for everyone to work together and cast aside the madness. A way to get to production faster, using containers, and continuously integrating and delivering. And what if you could see it live at the Red Hat Summit? Yeah, that’d be cool…

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Push it real good: Continuous delivery at the push of a button

Andrew Rubinger, an architect within Red Hat’s developer programs group, showed us how to revolutionize your deployments. Sounds like a long, complicated talk–surely something like this takes forever to set up. Actually, this was the shortest talk I’ve ever experienced at a Red Hat Summit. 

That’s not a bad thing. It speaks volumes to the shift that we’re seeing in IT. The tools are there. They have the power and can do what we want and need. The change is in how people interact with those tools.

Good news: It’s finally getting easy.

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Lessons learned on the DevOps front: A Red Hat tale

I love a good story. I love it even more when the story is true. Today’s session with two fellow Red Hatters, Katrinka McCallum, VP of product and technology operations, and Jay Ferrandini, senior director of worldwide DevOps, gave me both. And it makes me even more excited that their session was about Red Hat eating its own dogfood or, if you prefer, drinking its own champagne.

“We might not be delivering what our customers want…”

Red Hat engineering had a problem when it came to dealing with Red Hat operations. This was referred to as the “banana and pickle problem.” Engineering/QE would come to operations asking for something–a solution that they desperately needed. Let’s call the requested solution the banana. They came to the team and asked for a banana. Ops went away into a black box development cycle and delivered…a pickle. Not exactly the same thing. Similar in some ways, but not what was requested.

This is an issue that many teams face. They’re segmented in such a way that there’s no collaboration or communication across the teams, at least not in a meaningful way.

Maybe DevOps can save the day?

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The Red Hat security roadmap

Josh Bressers, security strategist for Red Hat, laid down the law for the current state and future of security at Red Hat in today’s roadmap session. When talking roadmaps, nothing is definite–Josh stressed that on several occasions and offered some guidance on when we might see some of these advancements. Still, nothing is certain until it’s certain.

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Photo by Marc Falardeau

Foundation > Platform > Technologies > Usage

Security is big. Really big. Especially within the past year, we’ve seen lots of security issues and vulnerabilities exposed, freaked out over, and resolved. It’s on everyone’s mind and the answer to all of this isn’t a silver bullet. Security is not a single solution, but everything in your infrastructure working together–along with your users. If you don’t use it securely, it doesn’t matter how secure it is at the bottom.

 

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Lessons using Ansible at J. Crew

Ansible, Ansible, Ansible. Oscar González, principal engineer at Sawyer Effect, gave a unique presentation today about J.Crew’s use of DevOps and Ansible Tower by Red Hat. As you may know, Red Hat acquired Ansible earlier this year and the addition has been phenomenal. Ansible gives your business simple, agentless automation technology.

“I’m a developer. I’m sorry.”

In 2015, Sawyer Effect was brought out to J. Crew to help improve their deployment process. They had a problem: A deployment would take 4-5 hours and had to be done overnight. What’s more, the entire process was like having a Rube Goldberg machine–lots of small moving parts which would, at some point, fail. The worst part of all of this was the toll it was taking on the teams. The human price was steep. Oscar likened this to Sisyphus–doing something over and over, learning nothing, not progressing, and keeping innovation from ever happening.

Something had to be done.

I’ll cut to the chase. J. Crew used Ansible, a DevOps approach, and their current tools and infrastructure to completely revolutionize their deployments. Oscar broke this down into 10 lessons.

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