You CAN teach an old bank new tricks: Société Générale and Ansible

This is the story of a forward-thinking CIO of corporate IT named Bruno Delas. He had a vision to create a new kind of startup team inside his IT department. He wanted to identify and overcome the limitations that keep traditional organizations from being able to develop applications at a rapid pace the way startups can. Could his organization do scrum, DevOps, or lean and be successful?

Was it a matter of organizational change, as Clayton M. Christensen suggested in Innovator’s Dilemma? Would the team need to be autonomous in order to shed heavy organizational structures and limitations? He knew he needed some help.

One day, Delas met a CTO named Fabrice Bernhard. Bernhard was from a small, agile web and mobile development firm.

Their organizations couldn’t be more different. Société Générale, Delas’ firm, is a 150-year-old multinational banking and finance company with more than 175.000 employees. Bernhard’s firm, Theodo, was less than 10 years old and employed barely more than 100 people.

Together, they set a lofty goal: Build and deploy new apps in less than 2 months.

Manage your digital transformation with Red Hat

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Alessandro Perilli (@giano), GM, management strategy

3 trends are pushing enterprises to adopt a better management strategy. Customers want:

  • Ease of use
  • Speed
  • Modularity

Why? Because enterprise users are consumers too, and they want the same experience at work that they have in their personal lives.

That’s according to Alessandro Perilli, general manager of management strategy at Red Hat, who explained how the Red Hat management portfolio helps companies with their digital transformation.

Frictionless. Programmable. Hybrid.

There’s a push for frictionless IT from enterprise users—they want the same usability they have as consumers. Evernote, for example, is a consumer-grade public cloud. “When we get back to the enterprise environment, we have the same expectations,” explained Perilli. And when that doesn’t match up, it’s jarring. It’s becoming even more true for younger millennial users, who have grown up with public cloud resources in their personal lives.

And hybrid doesn’t only mean hybrid cloud in this case. This is hybrid in the sense of different vendors working together, different products talking to each other, and different platforms being managed under the same roof.

Ready or not, it’s time to rethink storage

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There are probably exabytes of just internet cat pictures.

It’s no secret that we’re in the midst of a data explosion. Digital assets have grown due to web-scale services like Facebook, YouTube, and Netflix.

50% of households use video on-demand services. And the medical industry has vast imaging needs. These are only some of the causes.

Taking the FUD out of private cloud and OpenStack

Even though it’s been around since 2000, with technology like OpenStack, there’s a lot of hype (and fear, uncertainty, and doubt–or FUD) to weed through. Is OpenStack being used in production? Is public cloud the new cloud?

Margaret Dawson, head of global product marketing at Red Hat, started her Building a private cloud with OpenStack Summit session saying she would arm us with “ways to combat the hype in the marketing, ways to justify why you want to use OpenStack, and real-world examples of OpenStack deployments.”

What is OpenStack?

A modular, open-source software platform for cloud computing with components that manage resources or compute, networking, and storage. In IT parlance, it’s private cloud, or Infrastructure-as-a-Service (IaaS).

Why should you care?

  • Private cloud computing is the #1 major IT initiative planned for completion in 2016 by Red Hat customers
  • OpenStack is the leading private cloud technology (40% of Red Hat customers polled plan on launching OpenStack POC or production deployment)

Open source hardware sparks innovation

Nathan Seidle, founder and CEO of SparkFun Electronics, believes open source is not only good for humanity, but also good for business. SparkFun is a successful online retailer that sells the parts people need to build electronics projects.

He started his talk by describing some of the “crazy” (his word, not mine) things some of his customers have made with SparkFun products:

  • One customer used SparkFun cell phone modules and solar cells to track falcon migration across North America.
  • Another put a SparkFun sensor under a trampoline and connected it to the valve (and flame) on a propane tank. The idea was, the harder you jump, the bigger the flame.
  • And my favorite: A customer used a SparkFun motion sensor, a microcontroller, and a blender to create the “blender defender.” The purpose? To keep cats off kitchen counters.

Red Hat Container Technology Strategy

“Control and choice”

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In the late 20th century, the datacenter underwent a succession from proprietary mainframes to UNIX to Linux®. This was largely a result of software innovation presenting robust, cheaper alternatives to the previous extremes of vertical integration. As new freedoms arose, the centralized control once held by IT administrators was fragmented, and developers began assuming some of the responsibilities. With diversified ownership and the ability to combine and tailor software, innovation became a major factor in creating new markets and technologies. Things became more flexible.

Open Source Stories: What is Penn Manor?

A film about empowering high school students to run their own open source PC helpdesk

Last year we premiered a special short film at Red Hat Summit called “Penn Manor.” Summit attendees helped us make a splash with this emotional story about how open source principles are changing the lives of students at Penn Manor High School. Since then, the program has grown and the film has received more views, accolades, and support from the open source community.