A DevOps duo from our cloud product strategist

Gordon Haff, a member of Red Hat’s cloud product team, hosts a blog and podcast dedicated to cloud and computing topics. He’s an expert in the field and has written tons of research, offered product and marketing strategy advice, and is frequently quoted by popular publications on a wide range of IT topics. He’s kind of a rock star.

At Summit this year, he’s been writing (and talking) about DevOps. Check out his posts over at Connection, particularly this hot topic pair:

Getting started with DevOps (for Devs) at Red Hat Summit
If you didn’t make it to the Decomposing DevOps: Understanding How to Get Started session that Haff hosted with Ansible developer Dylan Silva, this is the next best thing.

It examines the most important principles for developers starting out with DevOps processes, including automation, metrics, and modularity, and gives excellent advice through metaphor.

What are the right metrics for DevOps?
If you’re ready to dig deeper into one of the principles explored in the previous post, this is where it’s at. Haff discusses the traditional measurements and metrics that app development uses–and why they’re not all appropriate for a DevOps pipeline.

He also looks at the questions you might be asking, and the audiences who might have differing goals for the same processes.

You CAN teach an old bank new tricks: Société Générale and Ansible

This is the story of a forward-thinking CIO of corporate IT named Bruno Delas. He had a vision to create a new kind of startup team inside his IT department. He wanted to identify and overcome the limitations that keep traditional organizations from being able to develop applications at a rapid pace the way startups can. Could his organization do scrum, DevOps, or lean and be successful?

Was it a matter of organizational change, as Clayton M. Christensen suggested in Innovator’s Dilemma? Would the team need to be autonomous in order to shed heavy organizational structures and limitations? He knew he needed some help.

One day, Delas met a CTO named Fabrice Bernhard. Bernhard was from a small, agile web and mobile development firm.

Their organizations couldn’t be more different. Société Générale, Delas’ firm, is a 150-year-old multinational banking and finance company with more than 175.000 employees. Bernhard’s firm, Theodo, was less than 10 years old and employed barely more than 100 people.

Together, they set a lofty goal: Build and deploy new apps in less than 2 months.

Continue reading “You CAN teach an old bank new tricks: Société Générale and Ansible”

Open Source Stories: What is Penn Manor?

A film about empowering high school students to run their own open source PC helpdesk

Last year we premiered a special short film at Red Hat Summit called “Penn Manor.” Summit attendees helped us make a splash with this emotional story about how open source principles are changing the lives of students at Penn Manor High School. Since then, the program has grown and the film has received more views, accolades, and support from the open source community.


Continue reading “Open Source Stories: What is Penn Manor?”

Paul Cormier: App dev and operations for evolving IT environments

Talking ’bout an IT evolution (baby)

Some call it digital transformation. Others say it’s the evolution from traditional to modern, or from mode 1 to mode 2. Paul Cormier, Red Hat president of Products and Technologies, sees it as an evolutionary approach to architecture, processes, and platforms. In his keynote at the 2016 Red Hat Summit, he explores how these shifting landscapes affect both infrastructure and applications, as well as developers and operations.

To start, Cormier looks at infrastructure and app development through the lens of architecture, processes, and platforms.

Infrastructure

across-all-architecturesInfrastructure architecture is moving from proprietary to open source development, and from single footprints to a combination of physical, virtual, private, and public resources. These changes necessitate accessible software-based storage and networking, as well as common management and consistent applications. Without all the pieces working in harmony, infrastructure can become inefficient and complex–and that isn’t sustainable.

With all the changes to infrastructure, processes must change to match. More automation, better tools, and common management can help, but streamlined processes must infiltrate the entire organization to make increasingly complex infrastructure sustainable.

Similarly, the host platform must be utterly stable across the entire stack. Platform consistency is where Red Hat Enterprise Linux has made its mark–our customers can use the same foundation across physical, virtual, private, and public environments.

Continue reading “Paul Cormier: App dev and operations for evolving IT environments”

The future of Red Hat Enterprise Linux

What customers wanted: 2002

Gunnar Hellekson’s been with Red Hat long enough to remember what customers wanted in the early days, when they were still buying boxed software off the shelf of the local big box electronics store. What did they expect from the upstart software company back then? In Hellekson’s parlance, Red Hat’s business was “lighting up hardware and making software run.” Customers at that time primarily wanted:

  • Quality support
  • A vast* ecosystem
  • Peerless security response team
  • Options for life cycles (2 years, 10 years, etc.)
rhel-dependency-firefox-example
Firefox only has around 500 packages, and their dependency graph looks like this. Can you imagine what 10K might look like?

What’s happened since then?

The creation of separate streams for Red Hat® Enterprise Linux® and Fedora was a beneficial change that gave both room to grow. They continued to add value over time by, as Hellekson noted, “stuffing more things in the bag.” However, after a decade of adding value, Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 has nearly 6,000 packages—plus all of their associated dependencies and complexity. According to Hellekson, if you were to package up everything in the upstream of RHEL today, there would be around 10,000 packages.

Continue reading “The future of Red Hat Enterprise Linux”

At Summit: Elwin Loomis hails from the Store of the Future

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Title says it all

Elwin Loomis isn’t your everyday Director of Engineering. In fact, he’s not the Director of Engineering. He’s Target‘s Senior Director, Store of the Future. This unique title is important to him, because it symbolizes doing things differently. And Loomis is all about doing things differently.

Elwin is an engineer, a creator, a doer. But he’s no longer just hacking code—he’s hacking culture. Doers like Elwin get to ask the questions that he was asking the Summit 2016 crowd:

“What does your ideal workplace look like? What is the work that you do? Who do you want to work with, mentor, and be mentored by? What causes do you support?”

How business used to be

In the past, if you wanted your business to grow large, it took considerable investment in physical and digital resources. Infrastructure was the barrier to entry that kept the competition at bay. For a retail business like Target, these barriers included the supply chain, real estate, and relationships with manufacturers.

Today, these barriers are breaking down. The internet and other technologies bring improvements to manufacturing, creating, and funding businesses that make it possible to start up cheaply. And the amplification effect—how Loomis describes the ability of small teams to behave like big teams through repeatable processes, self-service, and automation—lets even tiny organizations appear quite large. If big companies cannot match these nimble upstarts, they will die.

Continue reading “At Summit: Elwin Loomis hails from the Store of the Future”

DevNation: Lessons from astronauts for developers

DevNation main hallway

Sam Atkinson proposes that most—maybe even all—developers love space. Even those who don’t probably love Chris Hadfield, the guitar-strumming astronaut who covered David Bowie’s Space Oddity from the International Space Station. These 2 topics are closely related, obviously, but not-so-obviously, they’re both highly relevant to developers who want better and safer development practices and processes. Here are a few highlights from Atkinson’s fast-paced, clever talk about applying lessons from the history of space exploration to modern development practices.

Continue reading “DevNation: Lessons from astronauts for developers”

Live from the Summit: Steering wheels and easy buttons for deploying OpenStack with high availability

RHELOSP-HA-sessionWith an opening slide of a Formula 1 racer, Red Hat’s Arthur Berezin, senior technical product manager for virtualization, drew parallels between the sport and deploying OpenStack.

Driving a car without your steering wheel is something you obviously don’t want to do,” Berezin said, “and sometimes it feels like you’re doing that with OpenStack—you’re the driver, and you need a way to control your deployment.”

High availability means “100% 99.999% uptime and making sure everything runs consistently on high scale,” he said, before introducing a new, easy way to deploy OpenStack and ensure high availability.

Berezin demonstrated upstream features in the RDO community that will be coming downstream to Red Hat Enterprise Linux OpenStack Platform soon: Foreman and Staypuft.

Foreman is an open source system for managing configurations, provisioning, and monitoring on multiple cloud providers including OpenStack. It’s a steering wheel of sorts, while Staypuft is “an easy button,” as Berezin described it, for installing Foreman.

THE EASY BUTTON IN ACTION

Berezin walked through OpenStack examples with Horizon, Cinder, and Network, explaining what features the RDO community uses now to ensure high availability for services, database, and messaging:

  • Services
    • Pacemaker cluster
    • HAProxy load balancer
  • Database
    • Galera DB replication
  • Messaging
    • RabbitMQ mirrored queues

Choose your options, hit deploy, and you’ve got a highly available environment,” said Berezin.

Staypuft puts you in control with dead-simple features to reduce deployment time and make life a little easier.

With a single selection button, you control your nodes and you choose the services you want,” Berezin said. “It’s that easy.”

 

More information

 

Event: Red Hat Summit 2014
Date: 2:30 p.m., Wed April 16, 2014
Type: Session
Track: Cloud deep dive
Technical difficulty: 3
Title: Red Hat Enterprise Linux OpenStack Platform high availability
Speaker: Arthur Berezin