Ultimate Guide to Red Hat Summit 2018 Labs: Hands-on with RHEL

This year you’ve got a lot of decisions to make before you got to Red Hat Summit in San Francisco, CA from 8-10 May 2018.

There are breakout sessionsbirds-of-a-feather sessionsmini sessionspanelsworkshops, and instructor led labs that you’re trying to juggle into your daily schedule. To help with these plans, let’s try to provide an overview of the labs in this series.

In this article let’s examine a track focusing only on Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL). It’s a selection of labs where you’ll get hands-on with package management, OS security, dig into RHEL internals, build a RHEL image for the cloud and more.

The following hands-on labs are on the agenda, so let’s look at the details of each one.

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The future of Red Hat Enterprise Linux

What customers wanted: 2002

Gunnar Hellekson’s been with Red Hat long enough to remember what customers wanted in the early days, when they were still buying boxed software off the shelf of the local big box electronics store. What did they expect from the upstart software company back then? In Hellekson’s parlance, Red Hat’s business was “lighting up hardware and making software run.” Customers at that time primarily wanted:

  • Quality support
  • A vast* ecosystem
  • Peerless security response team
  • Options for life cycles (2 years, 10 years, etc.)
rhel-dependency-firefox-example
Firefox only has around 500 packages, and their dependency graph looks like this. Can you imagine what 10K might look like?

What’s happened since then?

The creation of separate streams for Red Hat® Enterprise Linux® and Fedora was a beneficial change that gave both room to grow. They continued to add value over time by, as Hellekson noted, “stuffing more things in the bag.” However, after a decade of adding value, Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 has nearly 6,000 packages—plus all of their associated dependencies and complexity. According to Hellekson, if you were to package up everything in the upstream of RHEL today, there would be around 10,000 packages.

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