Burr Sutter & company blow your mind at Red Hat Summit

The best demos are live demos. They’re intense, fast-paced, and full of excitement–for the audience, of course. The presenters never want excitement. They want everything to work as expected. And the keynote demo this morning delivered all of that and more.

“Think of this as our flying trapeze act.”

Burr Sutter, Red Hat’s director of developer experience, gave a demo that spoke to the core of Red Hat Summit: The developers. The operations teams. Those that do. This demo built on the concepts that Paul Cormier addressed earlier in the morning. Developers feel many pains in their day-to-day lives and need resources to make apps work, then into production. Even getting their environment set up properly can be a chore. File tickets. Wait. Hope. Get resources. Code. Rise and repeat.

On the other side, operations teams are constantly getting barraged with requests from developers. Ticket after ticket comes in requesting resources. But developers don’t understand all that ops have to deal with. Dependencies, requests, patches, updates, more tickets, more requests, more updates. It’s impossible to keep up with.

DevOps to the rescue

The power of DevOps is that these teams can be linked together in culture, processes, and tools. What if you had a way to automate all of this? A single place for everyone to work together and cast aside the madness. A way to get to production faster, using containers, and continuously integrating and delivering. And what if you could see it live at the Red Hat Summit? Yeah, that’d be cool…

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Lessons using Ansible at J. Crew

Ansible, Ansible, Ansible. Oscar González, principal engineer at Sawyer Effect, gave a unique presentation today about J.Crew’s use of DevOps and Ansible Tower by Red Hat. As you may know, Red Hat acquired Ansible earlier this year and the addition has been phenomenal. Ansible gives your business simple, agentless automation technology.

“I’m a developer. I’m sorry.”

In 2015, Sawyer Effect was brought out to J. Crew to help improve their deployment process. They had a problem: A deployment would take 4-5 hours and had to be done overnight. What’s more, the entire process was like having a Rube Goldberg machine–lots of small moving parts which would, at some point, fail. The worst part of all of this was the toll it was taking on the teams. The human price was steep. Oscar likened this to Sisyphus–doing something over and over, learning nothing, not progressing, and keeping innovation from ever happening.

Something had to be done.

I’ll cut to the chase. J. Crew used Ansible, a DevOps approach, and their current tools and infrastructure to completely revolutionize their deployments. Oscar broke this down into 10 lessons.

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Red Hat Mobile: A walkthrough of the platform

DevNation is off to a great start and if you missed Cian Clarke’s overview of Red Hat Mobile Application Platform, I feel bad for you, son. And if you like live demos and real-world examples from your presenters, I feel extra bad. Cian broke his talk down to 3 slides and 40+ minutes of demos. We’ll get to that later, but let’s get some general info out of the way first.

What’s a mobile application platform?

For those that haven’t spent much time with mobile app platforms, Cian made it easy to see the power of being able to iterate fast, push updates, and track the progress of your mobile apps. Red Hat Mobile Application Platform gives you all of that and more.

Why a do I need a platform?

A mobile app platform is important if you’re dealing with multiple apps, multiple mobile form factors (tablets, phones, watches, etc), multiple back-end systems, developers, versions, etc. Basically, if you’re an enterprise working in mobile at all, a platform can help you manage everything–across multiple teams–from a central tool.

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Follow the yellow brick road to emerging technologies

While satisfying a management directive pushing for “cloud abilities” and dealing with some key challenges in its existing technology stack, Vodafone’s IT team decided to embark on a journey to update the company’s technology.

Following an early management decision, the usually silo-ed business and IT teams worked together to select the technologies that would carry the company’s integration framework into the future.

As there’s often some magic involved in migrating to a new product, Vodafone representatives will discuss their experiences with the wizardry of “buying a product” and the road they traveled to a successful solution, discussing the:

  • Main driver behind the migration process.
  • Key challenges, including performance and operations, that influenced the team’s decisions.
  • Technology comparison and selection process, which was largely successful because of active commitment, communication, and collaboration across teams and companies.
  • Good, Wicked, and Oz-some stories from the journey.

You’ll leave this session with your own yellow brick road guide for selecting the right technologies for your organization. You’ll also learn tips and tricks for successfully engaging with your providers, partners, and with teams across your organization.

GlusterFS: Current state & roadmap

In this session, we’ll provide an update on the current state of the GlusterFS community and discuss future directions of the project. Attendees will learn:

  • Details on new features in the recent GlusterFS 3.5 and 3.6 releases.
  • What lies ahead in GlusterFS 4.
  • How GlusterFS is being integrated with other projects in the open source ecosystem, including OpenStack, oVirt, and Apache Hadoop.
  • Use cases.

Real-world perspectives: Innovation Award finalists

Join the 2014 Red Hat Innovation Award finalists to learn how they use Red Hat solutions to stay ahead of the evolving IT curve. With 5 industries represented, you’ll hear about about various technology challenges and solutions. Learn how each of the winning organizations teamed with Red Hat to modernize and scale their infrastructures while saving costs.

Red Hat Enterprise Linux on Amazon EC2 with Amazon Virtual Private Cloud

In this 2-hour lab, you’ll:

  • Use an Amazon Virtual Private Cloud (VPC) to launch secure, private instances of Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6.4.
  • Use the AWS Web Console to create a key pair, security groups, and launch instances with user data.
  • Review VPC connectivity options including hardware and software VPN, bastion hosts, and NAT.
  • Launch and configure a bastion host and use that host to securely connect to private Amazon EC2 instances.

You’ll leave this lab with an understanding of the Amazon VPC security model, including subnets and routes, security groups, user data, and Red Hat Enterprise Linux on Amazon EC2, and a $25 AWS credit.

NFV through Intel’s Open Network Platform for servers

Network Functions Virtualization (NFV) and software-defined networking (SDN) are opening up new possibilities for service providers looking to reduce costs and deliver new revenue-generating services. In this session, you’ll learn more about the Intel Open Network Platform for servers, Intel’s reference design for NFV and SDN. This platform is based on commercially available, industry-standard Intel architecture-based servers and is geared to the evaluation, development, benchmarking, and deployment of NFV. It also supports Open vSwitch deployments used in the service chaining of multiple virtualized network functions and is the basis for validating and developing an SDN framework with OpenDaylight.